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Understanding Issue Statuses

Understanding Issue Statuses

You can use the status of an issue to show users in the system in what stage of development an issue is at a given time. 

Accessing Issue Statuses

As a system administrator, you can access and modify system-level issue statuses. You can edit some information about the default system statuses or you can create new custom statuses. For more information about creating custom statuses or editing system statuses, see "Creating and Customizing Statuses for the Workfront Site."

To access system-level issue statuses:

  1. Click Setup in the Global Navigation Bar.
  2. Expand Project Preferences, then click Statuses.
  3. Select the Issues tab.
    The issue statuses available in Workfront are listed on this tab. 
    issue_status_panel.png

Understanding System Issue Statuses

There are 10 original issue statuses in Workfront, 4 of which are required. As a system administrator, you can change the name of all the system issue statuses. You can also add new system issue statuses to match the needs in your organization. You cannot delete an original required system issue status. You cannot change the equivalent status of any of the system statuses, but you can delete system statuses that are not required. 

Changing the status of an issue is typically a manual process. However, there are times outlined in the following list when the status of an issue is changed automatically, depending on other factors that are happening in the system. 

You can customize the names of any of the system issue statuses. For more information about modifying system statuses for your issues, see "Creating and Customizing Statuses for the Workfront Site." 
The following issue statuses are provided with your Workfront instance:

System Issue Status When this Issue Status Occurs Actions that Happen when the Issue Is in This Status
New (Required Status) This is the default status for every newly created issue.  If the issue is on a project in a status of Current, the issue displays in the Work Requests tab of the users who are assigned to the issue. Users can now start working on the issue. 
In Progress (Required Status)

You may place an issue in this status to indicate that work on that issue has started.

If the resolution of the issue is connected to another object (a task, project, or another issue), the issue status is changed to In Progress automatically, when you change the status of the resolving object to In Progress. 

For more information about resolving objects, see "Understanding Resolving Objects."

If the issue is on a project in a status of Current, the issue displays in the Working On tab of the users who are assigned to the issue. 

When an issue is In Progress, the issue shows a value for the Actual Start Date.  

 

Closed (Required Status)

You can manually mark an issue as Closed when the work on it is completed. 

If the resolution of the issue is connected to another object (a task, project, or another issue), the issue status is changed to Closed automatically, when you change the status of the resolving object to Closed.

For more information about resolving objects, see "Understanding Resolving Objects."

 

When an issue is Closed, the issue is removed from the assignee's Working On list. In this case, the issue shows a value for the Actual Completion Date. 

When all the tasks are completed and issues are closed on a project, the project can be completed. 

On Hold (Required Status)

You can manually mark an issue as On Hold, to indicate that there has been a delay in completing the issue. 

If the issue is on a project in a status of Current, the issue displays in the Working On tab of the users who are assigned to the issue. 

When all the tasks are completed on a project, but there is at least one On Hold issue on the project, the project cannot be completed. 

Reopened (Equates with In Progress)

You may place an issue in this status to indicate that work on that issue was not quite completed when the issue was previously closed, and it needed to be reopened to complete the work.

If the issue is on a project in a status of Current, the issue displays in the Work Requests tab of the users who are assigned to the issue. Users can now start working on the issue. 

This status is important in reporting, to differentiate between issues that are open for the first time (usually in the New status), and issues that are opened after having been closed before (usually in the Reopened status). 

Awaiting Feedback (Equates with On Hold) You may place an issue in this status to indicate that you are waiting on feedback (typically from the Primary Contact) before you can continue working on the issue. 

If the issue is on a project in a status of Current, the issue displays in the Working On tab of the users who are assigned to the issue. 

If an issue is Awaiting Feedback, a project cannot be completed. 

This status is important in reporting, to differentiate between issues that are currently open but being worked on (usually in the In Progress status) and issues that are currently open but not being worked on because more feedback is needed to complete them (usually in the Awaiting Feedback status).  

Cannot Duplicate (Equates with Closed) You may place an issue in this status to indicate that you are closing the issue, but you could not see the problem that triggered opening the issue. The problem might still exist, but it cannot be replicated at a given time. 

This status is important in reporting, to differentiate between issues that are completed and whose problem has been addressed (usually in the Closed status) and issues whose problem is not visible at a given time (usually in the Cannot Duplicate status).  

When an issue is marked as Cannot Duplicate, the issue is removed from the assignee's Working On list. In this case, the issue shows a value for the Actual Completion Date. 

If all the tasks on a project are completed, and some issues are in a Cannot Duplicate status, the project can be completed. 

Resolved (Equates with Closed) You may place an issue in this status to indicate that you are closing the issue and the problem that created it has actually been resolved.  

This status is important in reporting, to differentiate between issues that are closed with or without a resolution (usually in the Closed status) and issues that are closed with an actual resolution (usually in the status of Resolved).  

When an issue is marked as Resolved, the issue is removed from the assignee's Working On list. In this case, the issue shows a value for the Actual Completion Date. 

If all the tasks on a project are completed, and at least one issue is in a Resolved status, the project can be completed. 

Verified Complete (Equates with Closed) You may place an issue in this status to indicate that you are closing the issue and that you have verified that the problem that generated the issue has been resolved.

When an issue is marked as Verified Complete, the issue is removed from the assignee's Working On list. In this case, the issue shows a value for the Actual Completion Date. 

If all the tasks on a project are completed, and some issues are in a Verified Complete status, the project can be completed. 

Won't Resolve (Equates with Closed) You may place an issue in this status to indicate that you are closing the issue, but the problem that has generated it cannot be resolved. 

This status is important in reporting, to differentiate between issues that are closed with or without a resolution (usually in the Closed status) and issues that are closed without an actual resolution (usually in the status of Won't Resolve).  

When an issue is marked as Won't Resolve, the issue is removed from the assignee's Working On list. In this case, the issue shows a value for the Actual Completion Date. 

If all the tasks on a project are completed, and at least one issue is in a Won't Resolve status, the project can be completed.  

Creating Custom Issue Statuses and Customizing System Statuses

As a system administrator you can add system-level issue statuses to Workfront. As a group owner, you can add a custom status specific to one group. For more information about creating custom statuses, editing system ones or selecting new default statuses for your issues, see "Creating and Customizing Statuses for the Workfront Site."

When you create a custom issue status, you must always equate the new status with an existing required system status. You must understand the behavior of the system statuses to know which status is appropriate to equate your custom status with. After you have selected your equal status this selection cannot be changed. For more information about the system issue statuses, see "Understanding System Issue Statuses."

After you create issue statuses, consider the order in which the statuses will display on issues. To change this order you must reorder the statuses associated with each issue type, as well as each group with which the project of the issue can be associated. For more information about status order for issues, see "Understanding Status Order for Issues."